Computatio Humanitatis - Digital Humanities

The advice is free and worth every penny   Sewarp from the internet focusing on Digital Humanities (including DH in Europe), Early Modern history, librarianship and the history of books and publishing

Talk: Alan Liu, “The Meaning of Digital Humanities”
Talk to be given on October 11, 2012, 4:30 PM
Location: FHI Garage - C105, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse, Duke University, 114 S. Buchanan Ave., Durham, NC 27708
In a talk responding to a request by PMLA, Alan Liu charts the internal trends in the Digital Humanities, including a reading of a state-of-the-art work of text mining.  He also considers the Digital Humanities as a register of the major difficulties for the humanities in general in society today.  
Alan Liu is Professor and Chair of the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara.  He is the author of the The Laws of Cool:  Knowledge Work and the Culture of Information, and Local Transcendence:  Essays on Postmodern Historicism and the Database, among other books.  His work has been recognized by an NEH Fellowship, an ACLS Fellowship, and numerous grants. 
Introduction by Timothy W. Lenoir, Professor and primary Kimberly Jenkins Chair for New Technologies and Society.
Co-sponsored by the National Humanities Center, Franklin Humanities Institute, the Literature Program and the English Department at Duke University. (See The Meaning of Digital Humanities | HASTAC.)

Talk: Alan Liu, “The Meaning of Digital Humanities”

Talk to be given on October 11, 2012, 4:30 PM

Location: FHI Garage - C105, Bay 4, Smith Warehouse, Duke University, 114 S. Buchanan Ave., Durham, NC 27708

In a talk responding to a request by PMLA, Alan Liu charts the internal trends in the Digital Humanities, including a reading of a state-of-the-art work of text mining.  He also considers the Digital Humanities as a register of the major difficulties for the humanities in general in society today.  

Alan Liu is Professor and Chair of the English Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara.  He is the author of the The Laws of Cool:  Knowledge Work and the Culture of Information, and Local Transcendence:  Essays on Postmodern Historicism and the Database, among other books.  His work has been recognized by an NEH Fellowship, an ACLS Fellowship, and numerous grants. 

Introduction by Timothy W. Lenoir, Professor and primary Kimberly Jenkins Chair for New Technologies and Society.

Co-sponsored by the National Humanities Center, Franklin Humanities Institute, the Literature Program and the English Department at Duke University. (See The Meaning of Digital Humanities | HASTAC.)

— 2 years ago with 2 notes
#digital humanities 
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